How long should I practice?

How long should I practice? You should read the previous blog about practice too. The amount of time you have available will depend on your circumstance (working hours, homework etc.) so you need to decide on a goal for your practice each week and work towards that. (This week I’ll learn how to play an F chord properly or I’ll learn a new scale)

If you have just started learning and have never played an instrument before then about 20mins a day should be fine (if you’re an adult). If you have a  young child starting to learn then 5-10mins daily should be ok to start with, the important thing being to encourage them to practice and develop a routine.

If you are at an intermediate stage and want to make some real progress well then at least an hour a day should do it.

If you’re studying classical guitar for example and your preparing for a grade 8 exam I’d say 2 hours a day minimum.

After some time practicing you will get a feel for how long you need to get all your work done and as you start progressing you will feel the need to practice more.

What’s the best way to practice?

What’s the best way to practice? We’ve all heard ‘Practice makes perfect’. Well I’m going to amend that to careful practice makes perfect. You can change the adjective to diligent or focused or whatever you like but the point is that just playing an instrument for an hour a day might not give you the dividends you expected in your progress. Why? Well because you need to be working on the elements of your playing that need work and doing this in a focused fashion. Even though this might sound obvious a lot of students will admit to just playing what they can already play well and while this might be fun it will not help much in moving along your progress.

The important thing is to have some sort of structure to your practice.

Realistically work out how much time you will have available, let’s say 30mins, 4 days a week.*

Now we need to divide that 30mins so you get the most from it. At the start of your session you should be more focused so work on whatever this weeks goal is…so 10mins on that. Then if you have a new song/piece give that the next 10mins and the final 10mins can be spent playing something you already know how to play. If you’re at the stage where you are learning scales then ‘warm up’ with scales before you start into your practice.

This is not a strict timetable and should be flexible so if today you feel your weekly goal has been achieved you could spend extra time learning a new song – maybe something that includes your weekly goal.

For example your weekly goal might be to improve a technique like ‘hammer-ons’ or improve bending strings or learn a new scale etc. There’s a lot of possibilities…

*I’ve purposely set the practice time low as a lot of students will say they don’t have enough time but 30mins a day should be possible for everyone.  There are 168 hours in a week!! Maybe this TED talk might help to give some inspiration.

 

Cult of Personality

After writing about meeting Dave Gilmour it got me thinking about all the other famous and maybe not-so-famous people I’ve met whilst working in music shops. While the trappings of fame I’m sure has its moments, being recognised while trying to go about your business must be a drag. Everyone feels like they own you and want a piece of you, and your time, and your autograph too – why not? My meetings with celebrities range from the bizarre to banal.  Ronnie Drew (The Dubliners) had a row with me as he tried to convince me that the shop I worked in sold certain strings when, seeing as I had the stocklist in front of me I knew we didn’t. He was a trifle upset. I sat down with Andy Cairns (Therapy?) and helped him choose a guitar. As far as I can remember he came back again months later and bought another one from me too. I sold Chris Martin (Coldplay) a very expensive acoustic guitar that he bought as a present for Gwenyth Paltrow. I had no idea who he was, just some dude who said he wanted to buy his girlfriend a nice present. Pierce Brosnan bought an accordion from me when he was getting prepared for his role in Evelyn. Nice man, very polite and unassuming. (As a kid I’d actually bumped into him years previously when he was shooting Remington Steele in the Phoenix Park, Dublin.) Nils Lofgren (E Street Band) was hilarious, came into the shop with his crew looking to buy a guitar lead I think. A lot of big names just send the crew out to do the menial tasks, but not Nils. It was too long ago now to remember what was said but I do remember we had a good laugh. Put me on the guest list to his show that night too. Great gig, he reminded me of Iggy Pop for sheer raw energy on stage.

There’s definitely more but I need to scour the recesses of the old memory, it’s been a while since I worked the shop floor.

 

 

 

 

Photo of Nils by Gerry Gardner – originally posted to Flickr as Nils Lofgren Ronnie Scotts 97, CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=6283747

Time

During the early 90s I worked in a posh music shop called Chappell of Bond Street, which as the name suggests was situated in that exclusive area of London. It thought of itself as being upmarket, (maybe it still does) and was frequented by wealthy sheiks and Queens of African states. I was in charge of the Guitar department  but my accessory counter, (strings, picks etc.) was shared with the Brass & Woodwind dept. so I had to know about any products relating to that department too.  I answered the phone one morning to an enquiry about metronomes; the clock-like device that musicians use to keep time. The basic electronic models began at about £20 I informed the caller, to which I was told that this item was to be a gift, so I countered that we had a very nice wooden clock-work, pendulum type in stock that would make a perfect present for £80. That would be great, could I put it aside for a Mr. Gilmour for collection later that day? Of course sir. I hung up the phone, immediately thinking ‘Wouldn’t it be hilarious if it turned out to be Dave Gilmour?’ You have to remember  that as a young 20year old guitarist and fan of Pink Floyd this was a natural train of thought. I dismissed the idea thinking that  this was London after all and how many Mr. Gilmours could there be in that metropolis? So when later that afternoon a certain guitar player from Pink Floyd stood before me requesting to see the metronome he’d reserved earlier I was star-struck. I tried to remain calm, I did try, but here 2 foot away from me was one of Rocks great guitar legends. My initial professional reaction was to feign indifference but eventually my excitement couldn’t be contained and I asked him was he doing any recording at the moment. It broke the spell a little bit. He  seemed like an affable man but I could see he was uncomfortable as soon as he realised he’d been recognised. He answered politely but without much enthusiasm. Sometimes it’s said that it’s not a good idea to meet your heroes, but to me he came across as an ordinary bloke just wishing to go about his business without being hassled which is fair enough and probably much harder to do nowadays.  I wish I’d kept a copy of his signature though.